‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ impresses with its maturity and continued personality

Editor’s Note: In an attempt to keep some resemblance of consistency, I’m actually getting another review out the gate faster than I thought I would. I’ve written a review for almost every Marvel movie (Thor: The Dark World and Ant Man) since Iron Man so I wanted to get this out there as quickly as I could. Actually really liking the movie didn’t hurt either. 

The first Guardians of the Galaxy is definitively my favorite of the Marvel Studios’ canon at present period. I wouldn’t say there was a single terrible movie in the batch. It mainly falls to some being much more memorable than the others, and out of all of them I’d wager Guardians is the one to beat in that regard.

My review of the first film can be found here.

Writer/director James Gunn just brought such a voice to that film movie it  transcended beyond anything the company had done up to that point. Much credit to Marvel for actually allowing the guy to down his thing albeit within the confines of their big picture. I just wish the same sort of situation could have worked out for Edgar Wright and his Ant Man movie which I would have thought to the be the one that topped Guardians but I digress.

Going into the sequel, I didn’t have much doubt I’d enjoy it particularly since Gunn was coming back along with the entire original cast. The question was whether it could actually surpass the original. Too often sequels go too big, favoring familiar rather than innovation. Luckily Gunn is a smart enough filmmaker to largely bypass some sequel (Chris) prat falls other directors do, delivering a product that may not be as good as its predecessor but comes mighty damn close in some respects.

This will be a spoiler free review, Nick.

The plot:

“Set to the backdrop of ‘Awesome Mixtape #2,’ Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 continues the team’s adventures as they traverse the outer reaches of the cosmos. The Guardians must fight to keep their newfound family together as they unravel the mysteries of Peter Quill’s true parentage. Old foes become new allies and fan-favorite characters from the classic comics will come to our heroes’ aid as the Marvel cinematic universe continues to expand.” – IMDb.com

The review: 

Thankfully that all important personality I was drowning on and on about in the preface carries over here, almost even more so. There are so many weird things I want to talk about because Gunn goes for some off-the-beaten path pulls this time around. I remember freaking out in the first film when he went so far as to include Howard the Duck (who returns briefly) near the end. Here we have Ego the Living Planet as a major character as well as shout-outs to the original Guardians of the Galaxy (led by an actor I’m surprised wasn’t included in the marketing more) and even the Watchers.

Pardon me as a scratch off yet another thing I assumed I’d NEVER see in a major motion picture.

It’s also a movie bursting to the brim with color, unafraid to embrace an entire palate rather than brood in the shadows providing yet another line-in-the-sand for Marvel against their distinguished competition over at DC.

Gunn is our sole credited writer this time out and it shows, given this movie does something almost unthinkable in relation to the sequel-dominated cinescape we find ourselves in today: rather than expanding this insane universe, Gunn brings us inward. At times, this movie is downright intimate; given that once again a talking raccoon and sentient tree are major characters, this is all the more shocking.

From the offset, Gunn shows us how these characters have changed since last we met. Peter Quill aka Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) is a little less reckless, recognizing himself as the caretaker of his team’s larger-than-life personalities. Gamora (Zoe Saldana) is less hardened, actually opening herself up to genuine care and affection. The same could be said of Drax (Dave Bautista), who is downright jovial this time around. Conversely, Rocket (Bradley Cooper) is a much more bitter; his wise cracks sporting a sharper edge.

Also Groot (Vin Diesel) is now a baby….referred to as Baby Groot, obviously.

Oh by the way, Gunn communicates all this subtly within the first ten minutes of the film; no easy feat to be sure, particularly just how many characters I just listed without even getting to the rest of the returning cast and new recruits.

Largely focused on the idea of a family being what you make of it (much like the first film), Vol 2 splits our characters off from one another for portions of the film, partnering them up with another guardian as to allow for some further development/playing of each other in different ways. 

Think of it like the fourth season of Arrested Development only here we actually have multiple scenes of the entire family altogether.

As you may have guessed, the story kind of takes a back seat in this entry leaving a film that is much more leisurely in its pacing. The larger MCU doesn’t really factor into the events, leaving our characters to take the reigns which I actually ended up liking quite a bit. It doesn’t hurt that these are such lovable and weird characters obviously.

The cast is again uniformly outstanding. Dave Bautista’s Drax is yet again the comedic highlight and in many ways come to represent the heart of this franchise. He gets to spend some quality time with Mantis (Pom Klementieff), a personal favorite of mine from the comics. Their interactions are basically everything I wanted and more, leading to some of the movie’s funniest bits.

I was kind of worried Marvel was going to lean in really hard on Baby Groot, who is obviously very adorable, but luckily he’s used effectively and more or less sparingly.

If the movie were to belong to anyone in front of the camera, it’d be Gunn mainstay Michael Rooker pictured below with a local drunk.

Rooker’s Yondu is partnered with Rocket and the two really get down to the nitty gritty as to why their characters are they way that they are, both of whom share arguably the best arcs in the entire film. Quill’s notion of “building your family around” is something that obviously stemmed from Yondu, and is explored to poignant effect here.

Rooker’s one of those character actors that is basically good in everything he appears in, which is no easy feat given the sheer scope of his body of work as a character is. Seriously go check out his IMDb page and come back. So know I’m serious when I say this may just be his best performance to date. I won’t divulge into specifics but the movie’s best beats (both comedic and dramatic) all go to him, and I feel it’s a performance we’ll all be talking about for a while. Given the guys super talented, it should come as no surprise and it’s awesome to see Gunn give his friend such a hefty role in such a huge movie. Not that he needs it, but I hope this means we’ll only see more of him in bigger films.

This film also passes the bechdel test, which is something I always like noting in major blockbusters. Zoe Saldana’s Gamora, perhaps the least developed of the guardians, is given much more time with her adopted “sister” Nebula, played by my favorite companion Karen Gillan. The two share quite a few nice story beats throughout, playing once again into the whole family theme.

If anyone gets shortchanged, oddly enough it’d be Chris Pratt’s Star Lord, who is paired with his father Ego (of course he’s played by Kurt Russell). Pratt really doesn’t do a whole lot another the final act and it’s not like he’s out of commission a majority of the movie. He’s just a lot lest dynamic to the plot outside of he’s just met his apparent father. To go another further would be too spoiler-y, but even though it’s kind of late in the game, Pratt is consistently in his element here. Unlike Jurassic World or Interstellar, Pratt is the perfect quasi-level headed mantle piece for this insane galaxy to rest its shoulders. He’s an insanely charismatic everyman, unafraid to look stupid or take a joke at his expense.

So if I were to take any qualms with this one it’d be that it’s almost too easy on plotting, drifting off in some sections where some tightening could have been beneficial. This becomes increasingly apparent during the middle section where we linger on beats that drag on just a tad too long. This becomes jarring once things ramp up in the third act and we have action happening at a lighting fast rate.

The film’s soundtrack, following in the footsteps of the unlikely mega-hit that was the Awesome Mix, Vol 1, is similar to the film itself in that it is perfectly great but just not up to the exact bar of its predecessor. Their are certainly some stellar tracks put into play here though with my favorite Fleetwood Mac song of all time being the largest standout for me personally.

Although Glen Campbell’s inclusion was also a worthy of note too, particularly the ludicrously silly scene it accompanies.

To be a nitpick, I’d argue the songs in the first film “fit better” in that each and every one was obviously carefully picked one-by-one as to go specifically with each scene in which it appears. Vol. 2‘s soundtrack, while also doing this to a degree, feels just a little bit more like an oldies jukebox. There’s really nothing wrong with that. It kind of just boils down to personal preference. It comes no where near the level of ego/incompetence behind the ADD music cues in Suicide Squad, which were part showing off and part shamelessly attempting to emulate the success of the first Guardian‘s soundtrack.

In the end, it doesn’t really matter whether Vol. 2 a better movie than the first film; it’s a hell of a lot of fun all while being much more mature, opting not to rest solely on the past accomplishments of its predecessor to make it great. It builds on them. Think of this as the Paul’s Boutique to the first film’s License To Ill. Sure it lacks the populace appeal of the first outing as well as its conciseness, but it’s deceptively simple as it hides layers of complexity to be discussed and examined beyond its initial release.

I for one can’t wait to see this motley crew back in both Avengers 3 and the third (and presumably final) film with Gunn on writing and directing duties. Like it or not (why would you not), Gunn has carved out a whole universe for himself; largely undictated by the larger demands of the MCU and a sandbox for which he and his team may let their collective imagination run rampant.

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‘Doctor Strange’ is but a glance through a key hole at Marvel’s mystical multiverse

Maybe this is where I preface with how much I love the character of Dr. Stephen Vincent Strange a.k.a Doctor Strange a.k.a the Sorcerer Supreme.

Well…

There really isn’t all that much to say honestly.

He’s a character I sort of stumbled upon by accident actually when I was much younger. It’s probably not too much of a stretch to say I was initially drawn to the visuals to which I argue there are no better to be found in the comic book medium than a Doctor Strange book. He also probably has my favorite look of any in the Marvel canon as well. Not to mention possibly the best base of operations of any superhero. Yes, I am including the Bat Cave in that debate.

Character-wise, I think what I like most is his matter of fact-ness approach to magic. As a neurosurgeon, he is anything if not pragmatic. That goes along way when you’re dealing with stuff as goofy and outlandish as the typical problem of a Sorcerer Supreme. His last name should be a pretty clear indicator for the general tone of the conflicts in which he deals with issue to issue.

I also loved how his house served as a hub for a good portion of Marvel’s street-level New York heroes. I’m fairly certain everyone has stayed there at some point and when it was destroyed (for a bit…for like 40 minutes….for the fourth time….that year) it was always cool to see his friends rally around him and trusty manservant, Wong. Seconded maybe my Nick Fury, he had possibly the most extensive contacts lists of any one in Marvel.

All that said, I had no illusions in my mind that a Doctor Strange movie would ever exist. Well…except this one…

And yes…that is a young Jessica Walter (Lucille Bluth).

To me, more than any other comic book character, he was the bar upon which films would never reach.

Then this little movie happened…

Now that this exists, where does that shift? Squirrel Girl?

Oh.

Right. 

Well, for what it’s worth, this movie was made and I was pretty gosh darn(?) excited about it.

I wanted this to be my favorite Marvel movie.

And the trailers did very little to levy the fact that this would be incredible.

End result? Not incredible. Not great, really either. But a lot of fun. So…at least there’s that!

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The plot:

“Marvel’s ‘Doctor Strange’ follows the story of the talented neurosurgeon Doctor Stephen Strange who, after a tragic car accident, must put ego aside and learn the secrets of a hidden world of mysticism and alternate dimensions. Based in New York City’s Greenwich Village, Doctor Strange must act as an intermediary between the real world and what lies beyond, utilizing a vast array of metaphysical abilities and artifacts to protect the Marvel Cinematic Universe.” – Marvel

The review:

See this in IMAX 3D.

You’re doing yourself a real disservice if you bother with any other format. Perhaps the highest praise I have for this is that it truly is the first Marvel film that needs to be experienced on the biggest screen at your disposal. Oh sure, many of their past endeavors have been treats for the eyes as well but Doctor Strange elevates the bar (visually) to level in which all subsequent releases are sure to be compared.

Visually and conceptually, the effects owe quite a bit to the inverted physics of Inception with a healthy how-do-you-do to the East-meets-West influences of The Matrix. From those sparks however, Doctor Strange becomes what I presume to be the winner all of next year’s visual effects awards. Like…all of them.

Every sequence feels distinct, more innovative than the last. While it doesn’t reach the comic book-y glory that was the airport sequence in Civil War, there’s something to be said about just how outside the box this movie gets in relation to how it operates on a basic, visual level.

You’ll probably hear that certain sequences will make you feel as if you took LSD, molly, or whatever the kids are calling it these days. And to a degree, those statements carry validity.

Let’s go down the list. We have:

A race through an M.C. Escher-fied Manhattan war zone.

A fist fight between disembodied spirits.

More than one instance in which the Doctor’s iconic cloak gets a punch or two in.

A 2001 meets ultimate acid trip through all of time and space.

And that’s just a taste. Director and co-writer Scott Derrickson (who really hasn’t stood out to me as a director before this) really outdid himself in delivering such a distinctly-visual film in an environment that unfortunately seems to widdle down the unique flairs of its directors.

The cast, as is typical with Marvel movies, is perfect to a tee. I’d be lying if I didn’t say the could have been given more interesting things to do, but they perform admirably with the some lackluster lines scattered throughout.

There was a considerable amount of controversy surrounding Tilda Swinton’s casting as the Ancient One, a typically Asian role. To me, it’s a double-edged sword. Sure, it would be great to see an Asian actor given a high-profile role such as that but the stereotypes imbued with it, I think Marvel chose wisely in just casting an incredibly talented actress.

I also liked Cumberbatch’s Strange. He wouldn’t have been my first pick, but he defied my expectations here. He imbues Strange with same level of charming arrogance Robert Downey Jr. can in his sleep at this point as Tony Stark albeit different enough to where it doesn’t seem like he is merely mimicking the success of the other actor.

 I’m more than ready to see how he fits in with the rest of the MCU as a whole, particularly the ever-skeptical of magic Tony Stark.

Not to mention the onscreen reunion of the Facial Hair Bros.

Not to mention the onscreen reunion of the Facial Hair Bros.

We get a preview of what role he’ll play in a future movie in our now mandated first of two after credits scenes and SPELLS exciting things for a certain film involving a certain God of Thunder and a golly, green giant. Not to get too spoiler-y, but that quick scene made me so giddy at the mere fact that Strange is taking a similar role to the one he’s had in the comics for decades.

Every other actor and actress, while talented, kind of fades into the background. Similar to Terrance Howard in the first Iron Man film, Chiwetel Ejiofor serves as sidekick Mordo (not yet a baron), who will go on to become much more interesting in the sequel. (Hopefully they actually keep him around for the second film though.)

Our villain, Kaecilius, didn’t really do a lot for me. I guess he was fine to say the most, helped mainly by the fact that he’s played by our most recent Dr. Lecter, Mads Mikkelsen. The guy probably sleeps with a menacing face on.

I got a kick out of Benedict Wong’s take on Wong. It would have fairly easy to get uncomfortable with that character, but I think this interpretation is largely successful.

Also he’s not in it long enough to really offend anyone. Assuming he plays a larger role in future films, (as I require him to) hopefully they keep that balance up.

The only performer who I felt was kind of wasted was Rachel McAdams. She’s fine but she’s equated to same role as Natalie Portman in the Thor films in that we needs someone to humanize this asshole of a main character for us but otherwise serves no real purpose in the plot. Oh wait….I just remember….Michael Stuhlbarg is in this too. Okay, mark that as TWO wasted performers.

As with the comic, the character’s origins mirror that of Iron Man’s which leads me to the only substantive argument I can petition concerning this film, and it is a biggie. For all the bells and whistles, it is about as generic as white bread with no crust and a side of milk. There are some flourishes here and there (I really love how the good doctor approaches his final confrontation with the big bad at the film’s conclusion as well as its resolution), but the crux of the story is something we’ve seen again and again and again and again.

It’s a common complaint I share regarding superhero films in general.

I’d probably be less disappointed if I hadn’t been naive enough to buy into the rumors spread by alleged gross person Devin Faraci at birth.death.movies that the film WOULD NOT be another origin story.

Look, I get it. Disney is all about accessibility and when you’re entering a pool as crazy as the magical side of the Marvel Universe, you’re going to want to go in with some floaties first particularly if you have no experience with it.

There is also lion’s share credit to had by Derrikson and his co-writers for cramming what could have been Star Trek levels of exposition and explanation and quasi-comfortably fitting it into something much more digestible for John and Sally Q. Public. Fortunately, when that explanation does start to wear a little thin, the film wisely cranks up the action.

It’s a similar complaint I had to last year’s Krampus. Sure, it’s crazy but there’s so much potentially for more without getting bogged down in logistics. That’s the beauty of magic, particularly comic book magic.

I don’t want to play “Tyler writes a better movie,” but maybe they could have place a bit more focus on a normal character -coughmugglecough- who is cursed or is in someway affected by magic in which they need Strange’s assistance. Strange, is already Sorcerer Supreme as this point much in the same way Cumberbatch’s Sherlock is already a detective at the start of Sherlock. We then find out more about his world through an audience surrogate. I’m not arguing that is an anyway better. Hell, we’ve seen that story before too, but as we press forward, my origin story burnout is becoming all the more real.

I wouldn’t even hazard to say I’m disappointed. 2016 has been a fairly disappointment year in the blockbuster department, but I wouldn’t classify Doctor Strange as one of them. It’s fine. I say that a lot, but trust me it’s true. Movies can be just fine. They neither have to blow you away or make you angry. They can exist in the in-between successfully. I often harp on the fact that the most important aspect of any movie is whether it carries a memorability or not. That’s the most I can really ask of any film. I think The Incredible HulkIron Man 2 and Thor: The Dark World suffer the most in terms of that.

Doctor Strange‘s mere existence is a win for me. It’s coherence another.

So yeah, I enjoyed the movie for what it was. I’m honestly more disappointed I don’t have more to say about it given this is something I’ve been wanting to see for a good portion of comic book-reading life.

I don’t particularly have anything that profound to say about it outside I hope this sample platter of a film is simply a fraction of what Marvel has in store should we get a fully-fledged sequel. I think I said the same thing about Green Lantern, a movie I still maintain was not as bad as everyone made it out to be. It wasn’t great, but it too was fine. Like Doctor Strange, it left the door of limitless comic book possibilities open for something akin to my expectations. Unlike that movie, I think we have a competent company as represented by Marvel Studios behind the reigns to ensure we actually get to see those possibilities brought to fruition competently.

‘Deadpool’ succeeds at being a Deadpool movie by getting down and dirty with its absurd comic book roots

Whoda thunk, right?

Like cut back to May 2009. Right after you saw X-Men Origins: Wolverine and just how badly the character of Deadpool was handled in that film.

Flash forward to now, and we actually have a proper interpretation of the character.

To be fair, the film environment back then probably would not have allowed for a PROPER Deadpool film, but we are in a post-Guardians of the Galaxy world and in my book that opens the floodgates for just about any obscure character to get his or her own movie deal.

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I’m on the edge of my seat for the Rom major motion picture.

That isn’t to say Deadpool is any way, shape or form an obscure character. Not in the slightest. I’m not sure who describes Deadpool as a “cult character” other than those that have NEVER picked up a comic book or have NEVER attended a fan convention. The Merc with a Mouth is an INSANELY popular character and is only going to get more popular with a wide release film that actually plays to his strengths.

The first time I can recall experiencing over-saturation was with Deadpool. I don’t think you could pick up a Marvel comic book from the years 2008 – 2011 without Deadpool making a cameo at one point or another. Whenever I go to a comic book convention there are a minimum of 20 to 30 Deadpools of varying quality and spin on the costume (zombie Deadpool, pimp Deadpool, steam punk Deadpool, etc.). Now, my love of the character was pretty intense from my introduction around middle to about the end of high school. I eventually tired of the character however. Not to any fault of any particular writer, but Marvel as a whole. They were forcing him into EVERYTHING and I needed a break. It’s been a few years since I picked up a solo book staring Wade Wilson, and given that he’s set to blow up even more in popularity after this weekend, I don’t expect that to change anytime soon.

Do not get me wrong: I still enjoy Deadpool, as a character, quite a bit. (I even put together a low-rent costume two Halloweens ago.) What has always appealed to me (in the comics) is he is really only the comic book character to recognize and actively comment on the fact that he is a comic book character. (Sure, Animal Man met Grant Morrison but that moment is not something that is really ever recognized in later Animal Man comics under the direction of other writers.) He exists to be a smart ass in the way that Spider-Man can’t be. Because of this, writers are able to mess around with standard comic book conventions. For instance, he has active conversations with his thought bubbles.

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He is what I would consider a template for meta humor, which appeals to me in varying degrees. He’s very much a product of the 90’s (little surprise should come from the fact that he was created by the comic book industry’s resident bro-writer/artist Rob Liefeld), and I completely get while people both love and hate him. When written poorly, Deadpool is cheap catchphrase machine with sex and boner jokes that appeal to the lowest common denominator. He’s also a character that it’s rather tough to care about on a emotional level. Given that he’s both aware of his fictional existence AND has a super healing ability, it’s hard to care about whether he’s going to live or die.

If this movie was going to work, it needed to not only be smart in how stupid it was but also embrace its own absurdity that its comic book namesake. As long as you embrace the absurd, you can get away with just about anything.

Luckily, the team behind Deadpool don’t just make it to second base with that absurdity; they hit a home-fucking-run and go all in. Done with the sex metaphors….FOR NOW.

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The plot: 

“This is the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers, adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.” – 20th Century Fox

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIM1HydF9UA

The review: 

Right off the bat this is a movie for fans made by fans. There is a palpable kinetic energy to the proceedings from every one involved. A fun movie can only be fun if its participants are also having fun.

Clearly someone was going their jobs in both A) making this movie and B)marketing this movie. They understood what is so appealing about this character.

Any doubts that I may have had that the filmmakers where going to mess this up were almost immediately eliminated by the opening credits which are a perfect “you’re either in or out” thesis before all the mayhem begins. An overt nod to the comic book splash page, the filmmakers clearly know their stuff because each action sequence is fun, gag-filled and excitingly preposterous.

It’s almost as if Fox cared very little about this movie as long as it stayed under budget (a fact the movie openly comments on) and made money (given it’s a comic book movie, they must have assumed that was a safe bet) because director Tim Miller and screenwriters Paul Wernick and Rhett Reese throw almost every insane, crude, offensive, R-rated joke he can at the audience. Given this is the same studio that gave us that atrocious Fantastic Four reboot that reeked of studio intervention a few months ago, I’d be lying if I didn’t say I was a little surprised. Hell, we actually get Colossus (played this time around by Andre Tricoteux)  portrayed as Russian, a trait the other movies seem to be gleefully ignoring at this point. It even boils down to little details like making the eyes on Deadpool’s mask CGI so they can emote just like they do in the comics. Both Weasel (played by Silicon Valley-scene stealer TJ Miller) and HYDRA Bob appear for small parts. We live in a world with a live action HYDRA Bob, people! (He obviously isn’t a member of HYDRA in this, but we get an old friend of Wade’s called Bob.) Fox, take note: it’s not that hard to make a character look and act like they do from their respective sources.

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Oh…….oh no…….why………what is my life………?

I don’t think since Robert Downey Jr. declared he was Iron Man have we had a better actor to character translation. Reynolds, who has had three previous attempts at the comic book movie apple now including a previous shot at Deadpool, FINALLY gets a superhero film worthy of his considerable charisma. He was always the right choice for the character (the opening moments with the character in that piece of shit disguised as movie, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, where he can actually quip and y’know be THE MERC WITH A MOUTH, rank as the film’s only lively scenes), but now he has a full platform to show just how right of a choice he was. I hope this starts a trend of actors, who were great/perfect choices for comic book roles that got stuck in shitty comic book movies,  getting second chances. I’m looking at you for recasting Mark Strong for Sinestro in your inevitable Green Lantern remake, DC.

I take issue with anyone that says Ryan Reynolds is a bad actor. Sure, he’s been in bad movies. Who hasn’t in Hollywood? Like just about every other actor in Hollywood, he also gets miscast in stuff. But I dare you to watch movies like Smokin’ Aces, Adventureland, The Voices and the recent (and possibly his best performance thus far) Mississippi Grind. The guy has always done solid work and he’s finally starting land consistently quality stuff worthy of his talents.

Reynolds plays Deadpool as if he leap right off the page. For better or worse, this is pretty much Wade Wilson as he is in the comics albeit only slightly watered down in order to be at least a little palatable to a wide audience. Rest assured though, much like Raphael, he is still the rude, crude, fighting dude we all know and love.

His latter appearance in said shitty Wolverine film is cheekily reference but wisely ignored in terms of where it comes into play. (These X-Men films have never, EVER cared about continuity and it’s best we accept that now rather than later.)

Speaking of the film’s cast, I was a big fan of Morena Baccarin as Wilson’s main squeeze Vanessa (who will one day become Copycat).

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I got some heavy Marion Ravenwood vibes from her in that she matches our hero quip for quip and actively avoids being a simple damsel in distress troupe. Baccarin has been working over at the acting wasteland that is Gotham lately so forgive for forgetting that she is actually a very charismatic actress worthy of much more than that terrible, TERRIBLE show that I still watch for whatever reason. Excuse me while address Ms Baccarin (who I am 100% sure is definitely reading this): Yo, Morena! I know DC probably pays you pretty darn well and ya met the fatha of your child on tha set -and may dat child be a b-e-a-utiful and healthy child- but more stuff like dis please. You’re beautiful. I wish you well. Papa bless.

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Okay, I’m back.

If I were to have any major complaints, it would be for all the bells and whistles, the story is pretty rudimentary. While told out of sequence for the first half, the film follows just about every beat you would expect in a standard origin/revenge story. Even our villians – Ajax played by Ed Skrein and Angel Dust played Gina Carano – are basically one-and-dones that don’t leave much of an impact.

I know. I know. You’re never going to a movie from a major studio that throws away all convention. It’s just that when Reynolds is out of costume, the movie becomes wholly predictable.

I also suspect (but hope I’m ultimately wrong) that this may be a movie of diminishing returns. It’s not fair to say because I’ve only seen it once but this movie didn’t have the heart of similar weird comic book movies like Guardians and Scott Pilgrim Vs the World did. I’ll give it a few more viewings before I commit to that statement so take it as more of a worry than an actual criticism. 

Also while I LOVE that this movie was made with little supervision, I’d be omitting if I didn’t say that at times it looks straight to video action movie at points in terms of cinematography and location. A minor, MINOR quibble, as being an asshole, I must both have and be able to eat my cake.

We are teased with promise of Cable in a future sequel (stick around for the end of the credits for a Bueller-ian inspired tag), which both excites and terrifies me. If there is any character in comics that would be harder to justify in a film than Deadpool, it’d probably be Cable. Just look at his bio and try to make sense of it. I wish luck to whatever writer(s) tasked with that assignment.

Should this movie be a massive success and spawn a franchise, I fear Fox will start to pay attention and start instituting PG-13 ratings for maximum profits so the character can properly cross over with the company’s sister X-Men series. Two X-Men appear here, the aforementioned Colossus and perpetually teenage smartass, Negasonic Teenage Warhead (another deep pull I was astounded by) as portrayed by relative newcomer, Brianna Hildebrand. I argue for the opposite however. Let the Deadpool team work outside of the confines of mega-budget studio tent-poles and let the X-Men come to him. As evidenced by that shitty, SHITTY Wolverine movie, this is a character that just doesn’t work in a movie that does not revolve around him or at the very least a universe in which he can fuck with the rules because that IS the character; the outsider. The one who can actively comment on the world he inhabits and the world outside it. Given that won’t be the case, here’s hoping someone a lot more talented than I is in charge of incorporating the Merc with a Mouth into the proper X-Men cinematic universe without sacrificing all the good will Miller, Reynolds and the rest of the team did such a commendable job building here.