All men must cry: A ‘Game of Thrones’ spoiler blog

DO WE REALLY NEED TO GO THROUGH WITH THIS AGAIN?

YOU’RE GOING TO GET SPOILED IF YOU KEEP GOING.

LIKE…

YOU’RE NOT ALLOW TO BE MAD IF YOU KEEP SCROLLING DOWN.

LEGALLY.

I’VE SAID IT BEFORE.

WILL PROBABLY SAY IT AGAIN.

MAYBE.

MAYBE I’LL START TROLLING.

MAYBE I’LL START INCLUDING SPOILERS IN THESE RAMBLES…

>:)

LIKE…

WOULDN’T THAT SUCK?

FOR YOU, I MEAN.

NO, NOT YOU.

YEAH…WAIT…NO

YEAH, YOU!

hehehehe

SO…

HOW ABOUT THAT THUNDER?

SURE HOPE THEY BEAT GOLD STATE….

HMMM..

…..

…..

….HODOR…

(sobs)

….

…..

OKAY?

THINK THEY’RE GONE?

OKAY THEN.

HERE WE GO!

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Oh Hodor, we hardly knew ye.

Not to be THAT guy, but Game of Thrones hasn’t really had it’s own tragic moment. Sure, it’s had its fair sure of shocks and tragedy but a grand majority of those came straight from the Song of Ice and Fire books. Maybe I’m just greedy, but I have longed to feel moments that non-book readers (you scum, you) have felt during episodes like “Baelor” or “Rains of Castamere.” It’s something I assumed would happen. I mean it would have to right? Particularly since we are off-book (something I keep repeating like a moronic parrot so I’m just going to shut up). And the show has been slowly creating situations in which expectations (for book readers) would need to change, starting with Shireen’s death last season. We even saw an honest-to-god feel-good example of this last week with Jon and Sansa reunited last week.

The only shocking element of that moment however was the fact that the show actually let us have as it normally goes above and beyond to insure the opposite.

Well…I got one of those harsher moments last night….

Like…I can’t even. I don’t have an particular meaningful insight or perspective about it either. Just want to get his out there because….man….that sucked…and for those that claim to have “turned off their emotions” in watching this show as “everyone just dies,” is either A) a liar or B)a liar and someone turned themselves off from actually enjoying the show fully. Sure, it actually sucks from time to time but when it gets it right? There just aren’t many other shows that pull off whatever Game of Thrones brings to the table narratively and emotionally on the air right now.

I….goddamn….that was just brutal….even for this show, and if David Benioff and B.D. Weiss are to believed, it came straight from George R.R. Martin himself. How it plays out in the books has yet to be determined, but I have a hard time imagining it surpassing how it was executed here. Given the books are POV, I’m interested to see how Martin connects the dots given I assume we will be seeing it through Bran’s eyes at the time, who I also assume will be in a vision and not have access to what’s going outside his head in the real world. I’m a hack though, and have faith that Martin is going to deliver an effective gut-punch none-the-less, superior or not.

All I do know is this: when these (show) writers know what they’re doing (which doesn’t appear to be the case all the time -cough-SANDSNAKES-cough), THEY FUCKING KNOW WHAT THEY’RE DOING.

In one instant, we both say goodbye and hello to Hodor.

It’s a timey wimey twist worthy of Doctor Who or Lost. How appropriate then that this particular GoT entry is directed by Lost alum Jack Bender?

Now…given the recent influx of major players being offed this season, Hodor’s death isn’t shocking in and of itself, nor is it really remarkable by itself. It was definitely handled better than Osha’s last week given she’s been gone for too long, but Hodor has never been a “important” character in the grand scheme of the show.

Hodor’s speech condition/catchphrase hindered his ability to become a narrative in his own right. However, the internet (myself included) and its love for the character expanded his journey in a way I do not remember ever being present in the books. Sacrifices a.ka. the show’s death quota needs to be met, and Hodor dying holding the wights back so that Bran and Meera could escape is the type of heroic/tragic ending you would expect and hope for from a character whose loyalty never wavered, even when his courage couldn’t live up to it. No, the power in this scene lies within its utterly beautiful execution.

Watching the scene again in its entirety, you see just how eloquently put together it is. It hit me fairly quick once Meera shouted, “Hold the door.”

Me: Boy that sure sounds like…no…..no…..stop it……no….

Going to go out on a limb and say that was a journey a lot of other viewers found themselves on last night as denial was slowly beaten down by cold, harsh realaity….well, as “real” as murder by ice zombies can be.

Hodor’s final moment is ultimately heroic, but it is also undoubtedly framed by tragedy, and utterly complicated by the fact that Hodor didn’t seem to actually want to participate at all. I do honestly believe Hodor would have wanted to protect Bran (to the best of his ability at least), but I also know that he was a coward, plan and simple, who would never fight on his own accord. We’ve seen evidence of this time and time again. And we also know that he lived a life of ridicule because of his sacrifice, and because of a situation that Bran HIMSELF explicitly created when he brought the White Walkers to the location in which they were hiding. He not only gets Hodor killed, but his Direwolf (ANOTHER ONE?!?!), the last remnants of the Children of the Forest and the Three-Eyed Crow. (I have a theory now that he’s marked by the Night King, Bran is going to cause a headache for more than one person in the very near future as well…remember that joke in which Jon cautioned Edd not to let Castle Black burn down?)

It’s messy, no doubt, but it ultimately reinforces what’s unfolding throughout this series – actions and their subsequent consequences, both short and long-term. Whatever these characters decide is going to ripple through the storytelling, and we are past the point where things could possibly even course correct down the line. We now know Bran can directly affect the past, to what extent however has yet to be determined. It isn’t even clear what all happened exactly just yet. Apparently Bran has the ability to now split his consciousness in and out of the past. That is, he can pilot Hodor’s body while staying fully aware of himself in his vision of the past, and can affect present and past. He isn’t just a silent witness. Maybe a young Ned did hear his son calling outside the Tower Of Joy. What else might Bran be able to go back in time and “fix?”

The only thing (it seems) that we know for sure is this: Hodor’s purpose in life was determined by a young man’s impatience and his fascination with the past. Bran’s curiosity ultimately blinded him from the present, ultimately sacrificing Hodor against his will. Bran’s existence predetermined the death of Hodor.

For now though, let us mourn a character that, while not important, brought us joy as well as a time in which we could still laugh at this without bursting into tears.

 

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